PRINT

February 28, 2019

Local Drug Action Teams: 72 new teams join the Program

LDAT round 4 launch

On 28th February, Minister for Regional Services Bridget McKenzie appeared at a launch in Sale to announce the addition of 72 new teams Australia-wide to the Local Drug Action Team Program. This is a very exciting time as the program expands. The launch was hosted by the new Wellington Local Drug Action Team at their lead organisation Wellington Primary Care Partnerships, Sale Hospital.

The Australian Government and the Alcohol and Drug Foundation have announced the additional Teams, to join 172 existing Teams. Now 244 Local Drug Action Teams are established across Australia to prevent and minimise alcohol and other drug-related harm in their communities.

The Local Drug Action Team Program supports organisations to build or extend partnerships in their neighbourhoods and use local knowledge to deliver evidence-informed alcohol and other drug harm prevention activities that are tailored to individual community needs.

The latest round of applications was our biggest round of applications yet, with 123 communities submitting applications. The latest round of applications was our biggest round of applications yet, with 123 communities submitting applications. The latest applications were assessed by an external panel with a range of expertise, including Aboriginal health, alcohol and other drugs and population health.

Alcohol and Drug Foundation Chief Executive Officer, Dr Erin Lalor, said a high number of community partnerships applied to join the Local Drug Action Team Program.

“Strong demand from communities across Australia has meant the number of Local Drug Action Teams is higher than originally planned, giving us the opportunity to now work with many passionate community partnerships,” Dr Lalor said.

“An impressive 1300+ organisations are now part of Australia’s extensive Local Drug Action Team Program network. This shows how determined community organisations are about building healthier and more connected communities,” Dr Lalor added.

Local Drug Action Teams receive an initial $10,000 and are supported by the Alcohol and Drug Foundation to develop Community Action Plans, which outline evidence informed prevention activities to address local alcohol and other drug-related issues.

Local Drug Actions Teams can also apply for further funding to deliver their Community Action Plan activities.

Local Drug Action Teams help to strengthen their neighbourhoods by delivering primary prevention initiatives such as peer support, mentoring, education in schools, support for young people and resources to reduce alcohol harms in pregnancy.

Dr Lalor said tailored community led initiatives are vital in preventing and minimising harms caused by alcohol and other drugs.

“The Local Drug Action Team Program recognises that every community is unique and there’s no one-size fits all solution to addressing alcohol and other drug issues,” said Dr Lalor.

The Local Drug Action Team Program is part of the Australian Government’s investment of $298 million over four years under the National Ice Action Strategy.

We congratulate the new Local Drug Action Teams and look forward to working with them to prevent and minimise harms from alcohol and other drugs across Australia.

Map of Local Drug Action Teams across Australia.